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In memory : Khadija Saye

In memory : Khadija Saye

In memory : Khadija Saye

In memory : Khadija Saye

“We had just been to Venice, it was such a special moment. Her work got a massive reception. We had only just started making history but we all – her community, me, Britain – have lost someone very, very special" said David Bailey, the curator who put together the Diaspora platform at the Venice Bienniale, to showcase young racially and culturally diverse emerging artists.

Born to a Gambian mother in London, Khadija wasn't immediately surrounded by the privilege that could afford her the proximity to the art world until she won a full scholarship at the age of fourteen to the Rugby School. According to her mentor Nicolas Green, the experience at the Rugby school was difficult because of the contrast between her home life and the presence of privilege at her new school that she was aware of, unlike the rest of her peers.

“It gave her an understanding that confidence is a mysterious thing – she was in search of it because she’d seen it. I think maybe it gave her the tenacity and determination to find it in herself.”

Her series titled Dwellings : In The Space We Breathe , like most of her work was based on Gambian spiritual practices but with same using herself as the subject, which was considered brave for someone her age on such a big platform as the Venice Bienniale. In the midst of her growing success, Saye had to deal with a case of being arrested falsely and having her phone taken away from her, which explains why her last words to her friends and the world were made through her Facebook.

Khadija was fondly remembered by her creative peers as a remarkable spirit who went through a lot, but remained present for others.

In memory : Khadija Saye

Arts & Culture

June 16, 2019

In memory : Khadija Saye

WRITTEN BY:

Olamide Jinadu(Founder)

“We had just been to Venice, it was such a special moment. Her work got a massive reception. We had only just started making history but we all – her community, me, Britain – have lost someone very, very special" said David Bailey, the curator who put together the Diaspora platform at the Venice Bienniale, to showcase young racially and culturally diverse emerging artists.

Born to a Gambian mother in London, Khadija wasn't immediately surrounded by the privilege that could afford her the proximity to the art world until she won a full scholarship at the age of fourteen to the Rugby School. According to her mentor Nicolas Green, the experience at the Rugby school was difficult because of the contrast between her home life and the presence of privilege at her new school that she was aware of, unlike the rest of her peers.

“It gave her an understanding that confidence is a mysterious thing – she was in search of it because she’d seen it. I think maybe it gave her the tenacity and determination to find it in herself.”

Her series titled Dwellings : In The Space We Breathe , like most of her work was based on Gambian spiritual practices but with same using herself as the subject, which was considered brave for someone her age on such a big platform as the Venice Bienniale. In the midst of her growing success, Saye had to deal with a case of being arrested falsely and having her phone taken away from her, which explains why her last words to her friends and the world were made through her Facebook.

Khadija was fondly remembered by her creative peers as a remarkable spirit who went through a lot, but remained present for others.

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